Found Art


  • it is hard to lose a friend

    it is hard to lose a friend


    I met Elaine Ling at Gallery Arcturus where she was showing part of her Mongolian series. I was moved by her work and indomitable spirit which carried her to places unknown to most of us. Because of Elaine, we are able to glimpse these places and to sense their atmosphere. This was her gift.

    - deborah harris 



  • FILO (there is no movement without rhythm)

    FILO (there is no movement without rhythm)


    A shorter version of a wonderful video titled FOLI (there is no movement without rhythm).

    Life has a rhythm, it's constantly moving.
    The word for rhythm (used by the Malinke tribes) is FOLI.
    It is a word that encompasses so much more than drumming, dancing or sound.
    It's found in every part of daily life.
    In this film you not only hear and feel rhythm but you see it.
    It's an extraordinary blend of image and sound that
    feeds the senses and reminds us all
    how essential it is.

    Original full version created by Thomas Roebers & Floris Leeuwenberg and dedicated to the people of Baro.



  • David Hockney ­ ‘I Like to Live in the Now’

    David Hockney ­ ‘I Like to Live in the Now’


    "It is very good advice to believe only what an artist does, rather than what he says about his work." - David Hockney

    This video short was made by TATE Britain to announce the most comprehensive exhibition of David Hockney's works including photography, printmaking and of course paintings.



  • The Twenty Toes of a Master Juggler

    The Twenty Toes of a Master Juggler


    This video of foot juggler Roxana Kuwen was found on the YouTube channel Juggle Master.

    The original source video was a recording of a live show, but for this site viewing we muted the audience
    and added music to the performance.

     



  • My Sculptural Expression - Susumu Koshimizu

    My Sculptural Expression - Susumu Koshimizu


    Susumu Koshimizu is a Japanese artist known for making sculptures that expose the surface quality of different materials. He is considered a key member of the Mono-ha movement (‘School of Things’), which reacted against the embrace of technology and visual trickery in mid-1960s Japanese art.

    The Mono-ha artists sought to understand ‘the world as it is’ by exploring the essential properties of materials, often combining organic and industrial objects and processes. 
    'From Surface to Surface'  currently on display at Tate Modern



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